Security

Apple macOS High Sierra Fix Might Have Done More Harm Than Good

macos high sierra

Earlier today, we were happy to find one company that catered to its customers’ need in less than 24 hours. That was Apple. Now, we’d rather compromise on speed if it ensures a safe and effective release. What are we talking about? Apple’s super speedy patch for its macOS High Sierra security vulnerability. Turns out, it might have done more harm than good #securemagic

Over the past days, more users noticed that the fix wasn’t actually fixing anything, at least not long-term. Several Apple customers complained  that the “root” bug reappeared when they installed the most recent macOS update. That’s a major problem, given that the first security hole was serious to begin with. Any person or program could install software or change settings without the need for a user’s credentials; it was enough to type “root” in the place of a username and leave the password empty to bypass the system.

Now, re-installing the security patch after the latest upgrade only reactivates the “root” problem. Some of them did think of rebooting the computer, though, and that did the trick. But after failing to eliminate the bug post-update, there’s no pop-up warning to tell users that a reboot is necessary. So, many Apple owners might wait for a solution still, if they don’t think about the reboot.

The patch isn’t as effective as we hoped for, that much is true. That said, Apple has ears everywhere so it’s no shock that they’ve reluctantly (and belatedly) added the following tip on its security update page “If you recently updated from macOS High Sierra 10.13 to 10.13.1, reboot your Mac to make sure the Security Update is applied properly.” If they just

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